Extra Ties.

Leftovers (For Matt Usinowicz)

By Matt T. Allison

 

You don’t need to try hard to find sculptors that are trying hard. Chopping, molding, twisting, and breaking all with the intent of changing the raw into refined.

It’s a making that gets its strength from numbers, and a remaking that’s born of a battle with the devil who lurks in the details. It’s an ongoing process in which the end always remains near. Budgets empty, storage spaces fill, and shows go on with or without you. Overtime a sculptor’s materials become nothing more than materials for sculpture. Studios move, dumpsters overflow. As it seems there’s no scale too large for the landfill.

 

 You don’t need to try hard to find people with knives that are trying hard. Chopping, molding, twisting, and breaking all with the intent of changing the raw into refined.\

For those in a kitchen, however, the real process begins with everything that remains. Each off cut, scrap piece, and leftover must constantly be made new again. Daily survival is dependent on it. Waste has no place in a kitchen- not now, not then, not ever. A kitchen’s bottom line is dependent on efficiency at counter level- the undesirable must be made desirable in no time at all.

There is good sculpture, and there is better sculpture. The same can be said for what comes out of a kitchen. At their best, both practices render their makers invisible. But what of all that’s left behind? The end is always near for those in the kitchen as well, it’s just that they call it a service.